Faria Systems is hiring a

Senior Front-End Developer

Position

As a Senior Front-End Developer, you will be in charge of design implementation for Faria’s web-based applications. You will work with our Design Director, Derek Clark, based in Cape Town, to effectively and faithfully translate PSDs into elegant and well-organised styles that optimise performance while maintaining browser compatibility.


Characteristics

Does this describe you?

  • Good design sense & taste with OCD-levels of pixel perfection
  • Fully internalised visual and user interface principles
  • Expert in CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, graphic design, layouts and typography
  • Mad skills in Photoshop and Illustrator
  • Consistent Cross-Browser Compatibility
  • Self-discipline and strong time-management skills
  • Strong technical English
  • Key Responsibilities

    User Interface:

  • Full design control over the front-end of the product.
  • Building standards-compliant dynamic HTML and CSS.
  • Working with the R&D team to implement a smooth user-experience.
  • One guiding principle: Timeless design

  • Usability: Intuitive usability is uniformly applied. A genuine effort is made to design the most efficient process possible (i.e. minimizing the number of clicks in the most obvious way; ensuring that the system errs in favor of the user). This is evident through the navigation design and overall user experience.
    • What is bad usability?
      • No understanding of context.
      • Clunky, confusing and poorly thought out navigation.
      • Lack of prioritization and inability to justify tradeoffs.
      • Inconsistent application of buttons and navigation flow.
      • Suboptimal forms with massive excess white space or fields that have no relationship with the data (i.e. full row textboxes being used for text that will only be < 20 characters).
      • Lack of underlying logic to the design.
      • No thought or attention to error validation or different states (e.g. blank slate screens).
      • Allowing the user to make catastrophic mistakes (i.e. if delete buttons are used without confirmation messages, this is bad design because it does not err in favor of the user)
  • What is bad usability?
    • No understanding of context.
    • Clunky, confusing and poorly thought out navigation.
    • Lack of prioritization and inability to justify tradeoffs.
    • Inconsistent application of buttons and navigation flow.
    • Suboptimal forms with massive excess white space or fields that have no relationship with the data (i.e. full row textboxes being used for text that will only be < 20 characters).
    • Lack of underlying logic to the design.
    • No thought or attention to error validation or different states (e.g. blank slate screens).
    • Allowing the user to make catastrophic mistakes (i.e. if delete buttons are used without confirmation messages, this is bad design because it does not err in favor of the user)
  • No understanding of context.
  • Clunky, confusing and poorly thought out navigation.
  • Lack of prioritization and inability to justify tradeoffs.
  • Inconsistent application of buttons and navigation flow.
  • Suboptimal forms with massive excess white space or fields that have no relationship with the data (i.e. full row textboxes being used for text that will only be < 20 characters).
  • Lack of underlying logic to the design.
  • No thought or attention to error validation or different states (e.g. blank slate screens).
  • Allowing the user to make catastrophic mistakes (i.e. if delete buttons are used without confirmation messages, this is bad design because it does not err in favor of the user)
  • Aesthetic: The design is timeless, consistent and coherent with a clear, predictable logic maintained on every page.
    • What are poor aesthetics?
  • What are poor aesthetics?
  • Clarity: Questions are posed clearly.
  • Independence: Work gets done independently without micro-management.